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Full text of "Courses in physical therapy and occupational therapy"



Columbia University Bulletin 



SERIES 63 



NUMBER 4 



JANUARY 36, 1963 



THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE 



Cou 



rses in 



Physical Therapy 



Occupational Therapy 



1963-1964 




a// 



PLEASE ADDRESS INQUIRIES TO: Physical and Occupational Therapy, 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, New York 32, N.Y. 

Telephone: WAdsworth 3-2500, Extension 7941 



Columbia University 

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 



Courses in 



Physical Therapy and 
Occupational Therapy 

1963-1964 



Grayson Kirk, Ph.D., LL.D. President of the University 

Lawrence H. Chamberlain, Ph.D., LL.D. Vice President of the University 

Jacques Barzun, Ph.D. Dean of Faculties and Provost of the University 

H. Houston Merritt, M.D. Vice President in Charge of Medical Affairs; 
Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 






m'5i( 



Contents 



COURSES IN PHYSICAL THERAPY 3 

Admission Requirements and Procedure 4 

Program of Study 5 

Outline of the Program 9 

Hospitals Affiliated for Clinical Experience 10 

COURSES IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 12 

Admission Requirements and Procedure 13 

Program of Study 15 
Outline of the Program 20 
Hospitals and Agencies Affiliated for Clinical Practice 21 

REGISTRATION AND EXPENSES 23 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 31 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 35 



Columbia University Bulletin • Series 63 • Number 4 • January 26, 1963 

Issued at Columbia University, New York 27, N.Y., weekly from January for 
forty consecutive issues. Second-class postage paid at New York, N.Y. and at 
additional offices. 



^ Courses in Physical Therapy 



^ 



<^ CHAIRMAN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, AND 
MEDICAL DIRECTOR OF THE COURSES IN PHYSICAL THERAPY AND OCCUPATIONAL 

therapy: Robert C. Darling, M.D. 

DIRECTOR: Mary E. Callahan, M.A, 

assocl\te director: Ruth Dickinson, M.A. 

Physical therapy is treatment by the use of physical agents such as light, heat, cold, 
water, exercise, massage, electricity, and mechanical forces for the rehabilitation of 
persons with disease or injury. It also includes tests and measurements for the 
evaluation of physical disabilities. Its ultimate aim is the maximal rehabilitation and 
adjustment of the patient. 

As a member of a group, working cooperatively with the physician and with per- 
sons from other medical services, the physical therapist plays an important role in 
helping the patient to attain the highest possible degree of physical, mental, social, 
and occupational independence. The therapist may work in general and special hos- 
pitals, in treatment and rehabilitation centers, schools for handicapped children, 
home-care programs, and in physicians' offices. 

The program of study at Columbia is superimposed on a broad background of 
general education, including knowledge of the fundamental principles of the social, 
biological, and physical sciences. The professional curriculum is designed to give the 
student a foundation in the basic and medical sciences which underlie the practice 
of physical therapy. It proceeds from there to the knowledge and skills more directly 
related to practice. Through this integrated, sequential course of study, the student 
develops an understanding of the principles, concepts, and skills which are necessary 
for the proper practice of the profession. In addition to theoretical classroom 
instruction and demonstrations, students observe treatment procedures and receive 
experience in teaching hospitals under University supervision. 

The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded upon completion of the full two-year 
program, which includes clinical experience. This program is based upon two years 
(sixty semester credits) of college work in the liberal arts, including the proper 
science prerequisites. 

The Certificate of Proficiency in Physical Therapy is awarded upon completion 
of the programs (academic and clinical) prescribed for students of advanced 
standing. This program is based upon the background of either a Bachelor's degree 
from an accredited college or university or graduation from a nationally accredited 
professional school of nursing. 

The courses described in this bulletin meet the requirements of the American 
Physical Therapy Association and of the Council on Medical Education and 
Hospitals of the American Medical Association. These organizations regulate the 
standards by which schools are accredited. Graduates of either program are eligible 
for admission to the examination of the American Registry of Physical Therapists 
and for membership in the American Physical Therapy Association. 



4 PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Many states require licensing or registration of physical therapists, for which 
examinations are usually held at intervals during the year, A student should become 
familiar with the requirements in his state so that any required examination may be 
taken as soon as possible after graduation. In New York State the law requires that a 
graduate must pass the quahfying examination, conducted by the Department 
of Education of the State of New York. This examination is usually held in June and 
December of each year. According to the law in New York State only those persons 
who are citizens or who have filed intentions of becoming citizens of this country 
may be considered for admission to the examination. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students are admitted only in September. In subjects taken at other institutions 
for which transfer credit is allowed, a grade of C or better is required. The ability to 
swim is required for both programs of study in the second term. Students unable to 
swim at the time of admission are responsible for securing instruction for themselves 
before the second term. Applicants for admission must be graduates of approved 
high schools or the equivalent, and then must satisfy one of the following: 

FOR THE DEGREE PROGRAM 

The completion of at least sixty semester credits (two years) of liberal arts courses 
in a college approved by Columbia University. Courses must include : (a) 6 semester 
credits in biology; (b) 6 semester credits in physics; (c) 6 semester credits in Eng- 
lish; and (d) 6 semester credits in psychology.* Elective courses in foreign lan- 
guages, literature, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences are recommended. 
Students who have had a balanced education are preferred. 

FOR THE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

Graduation from an approved college with at least a Bachelor of Science or Bach- 
lor of Arts degree, the undergraduate work to include: (a) 8 semester credits in 
biological science; (b) 6 semester credits in physics; (c) 10 semester credits in 
social science (of which 6 must be in psychology) . Or: 

Graduation from a nationally accredited professional school of nursing with 
courses carrying college credit in the biological and physical sciences. Courses in 
the humanities and social sciences are a desirable background. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

Application forms may be obtained by writing to the Physical Therapy OflBce, 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, New York 32, N. Y., 
and should be filed by June 1 preceding the academic year in which the student 
wishes to begin his studies. The completed form must be accompanied by the appli- 
cation fee of $15. This fee is not returnable and is not credited toward tuition. 
Transcripts of all post-secondary education should be forwarded by the registrars 
of the respective schools direct to the Director of Courses in Physical Therapy. 

A personal interview will be arranged for each applicant. 

* Requirements for admission to tlie licensure examination for pliysical therapists in the state of New 
York include 6 semester credits in biology, 6 in chemistry, and 6 in physics. Students who plan to 
practice in New York State should accordingly fulfill these requirements. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 



Program of Study 



The University reserves the right to withdraw or modify these courses or to 
change the instructor as may be necessary. 



► DEGREE PROGRAM 

Degree candidates take the entire program of courses listed below and should 
consult the bulletins of Teachers College and the School of General Studies for 
suitable electives. The program is outlined on page 9. 

JUNIOR YEAR: AUTUMN TERM 

"'Anatomy 1 55. Human anatomy 

Professor Noback and Dr. Smith. 3 points. 

Anatomy of the human body, with emphasis on those features which are most important for muscu- 
lar activity. Instruction is given by means of lectures and laboratory work, the latter being based on 
prepared dissection of the human body. 

"Kinesiology 105. Applied anatomy and kinesiology 

Miss Brunnstrom and others. 2 points. 

Application of knowledge of gross anatomy of skeletal and muscular systems to mechanics of bodily 
movement. Analysis of skills used in daily activity and other activities in physical and occupational 
therapy. Lectures and laboratory. 

"'Massage 3. Essentials of massage and techniques of relaxation 

Professor Gurewitsch, Mrs. Bartenieff, and Miss Jones. 2 points. 
The theory and technique of massage and relaxation, with demonstration and practice. 

"'Nursing Procedures 17. Bandaging and dressings 

Miss Jones. 1 point. 

Essential principles and techniques of bandaging, asepsis, bedside conduct, and first aid. 

"'Orientation 39. Professional ethics and institutional organization 

Professor Callahan and associates. 1 point. 

A general introduction to the organization of hospitals and to the historical developments and trends 
in physical therapy. The development of desirable professional attitudes and interprofessional rela- 
tionships is also included. 

* Physiology 55 or 157. Human physiology 

Professors Dellenback {157) and Emmers {55). 2 points. 

A comprehensive discussion of the major organ systems of the human body and their functions, 
with emphasis on the physiology of exercise. Students with a minimum background of course work 
in biology, chemistry, and physics register for Physiology 55. Those who have had a comprehensive 
physiology course and considerable course work in biology, chemistry, and physics register for 
Physiology 157. 

Psychology 41 . Child development 

Dr. Bennett. 2 points. 

The mental, motor, social, and emotional development of the child. Special attention is given to a 
consideration of stress situations encountered by the child and his methods of handling them. 



6 PHYSICAL therapy: program of study 

Elective (3 points). 

Chosen with the approval of the adviser. 

JUNIOR YEAR: SPRING TERM 

Clinical Experience 2. Introduction to clinical practice 

2 points. 

Orientation to institutions, physical therapy departments, and patients; to record-keeping and to giv- 
ing massage and exercise. 

Exercise 1 12. Principles and application in treatment 

Professors Darling, Dickinson, Hoberman, and associates. 4 points. 

The basic principles of therapeutic exercise, including physiology of exercise, muscle evaluation and 
re-education, tests and measurements, and underwater exercises. Lectures and laboratory. 

^Orthopedics 136. Orthopedics 

Dr. Andrews. 2 points. 

Lectures and clinical presentations which are descriptive of orthopedic conditions, including discus- 
sion of related problems — social, medical, surgical, and rehabilitation. 

*Psychiatry 102. Elementary psychiatry 
Drs. O'Connor, Schucman, and others. 2 or 3 points. 

Etiology and symptomatology of the major and minor psychoses, including the psychoneuroses and 
their treatment. Lectures with cUnical demonstrations and field trips. Work for the third point in- 
cludes a survey of psychological tests and measurements, and the interpretation of their results for 
the physical and occupational therapist. 

^Rehabilitation 1 50. Rehabilitation techniques and problems of the handicapped 

Miss Talmud. 2 points. 

Theory, practice, and evaluation of functional activities; types, application, and care of supportive 
apparatus. Lectures and demonstrations. 

Elective (3 points). 

Chosen with the approval of the adviser. 



SUMMER 

Degree candidates spend ten weeks (June, July, and part of September) in 
full-time clinical experience at one or more of the affiliated hospitals (see pages 
10-11). They attend lectures, clinics, and staff meetings, receive supervised prac- 
tical experience in physical therapy, and are introduced to related treatment 
departments. 

Certificate candidates have a similar experience for four months (June, July, 
August, and September) . 

SENIOR YEAR: AUTUMN TERM 

Anatomy G4023x. Structure and function of the nervous system 

Professors Carpenter and Noback. 3 points. 

Primarily for undergraduate and graduate students in psychology, zoology, and medicine. Anatomy, 
histology, development, and architectonics of the nervous system of man. Morphological study of the 
nervous system, its function and organic disturbances, with special reference to the interpretation of 
the integrative action and functional control vested in the brain and spinal cord. Lectures, demon- 
strations, conferences, and laboratory work. 



PHYSICAL therapy: PROGRAM OF STUDY 7 

Clinical Experience 3. Supervised clinical practice 

2 points. 

Lectures, observation, demonstrations, and supervised practice in various clinics of physical medicine 
and reliabilitation. 

^Medicine and Surgery 101 . General medicine and surgery 

Professor Downey and Dr. Price. 2 points. 

General medicine (Professor Downey) : a survey of the more common diseases with emphasis on 
pulmonary tuberculosis and cardiac disorders. Lectures deal primarily with the relationship of patho- 
logical physiology to the development of signs and symptoms of disease. 

General surgery (Dr. Price) : a survey of those common diseases for wliich there is surgical empha- 
sis. 

Physical Therapy 1 1 5. Practical application of physical therapy 

Professors Callahan, Dickinson, and associates. 2 points. 

Integration and application to specific cases of the fundamental principles and skills already learned. 

Psychiatry 101. Psychosomatic aspects of physical medicine 

Dr. O'Connor. 2 points. 

A consideration of the emotional aspects of all disease. 

Speech 163. Principles and practice of speech science 

Dr. Eisenson. 2 points. 

This course covers the basic anatomy and physiology underlying speech science. Consideration will 
be given to the pathology of speech abnormalities and the therapeutic approach to their correction. 

Elective (3 points). 

Chosen with the approval of the adviser. 



SENIOR YEAR: SPRING TERM 

Anatomy G4024y. Structure and function of the nervous system 

Professors Carpenter and Noback. 3 points. 

A continuation of Anatomy G4023. 

^Clinical Applications 130. Survey of medical and surgical conditions in relation to 
physical medicine 

Professor Darling and associates. 2 points. 

This course gives the student a clear acquaintance with disease as it occurs in the practice of phys- 
ical medicine. Specialists discuss the problems in their fields of practice, including particular path- 
ology and the needs of physical medicine. This analysis is followed by prescriptive physical therapy 
to cover these special indications. There will be further clinical practice in hospitals. 

Clinical Experience 4. Supervised clinical experience 

2 points. 

Continuation of Clinical Experience 3. 

* Electrotherapy 14. Theory and practice of electrotherapy 

Dr. Kaplan and Miss Jones. 2 points. 

Theory and principles of technique of the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of high-frequency, gal- 
vanic, and other low-frequency currents. 

Kinesiology 206. Application of neurophysiological principles to human motion 

Miss Brunnstrom. 2 points. 

Open also to graduate occupational therapists, physical therapists, and physicians. See below. 



8 PHYSICAL therapy: program of study 

'^Neurology 106. Clinical neurology 

Dr. Gallinek. 2 points. 

Etiology, symptomatology, and treatment in diseases of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. 

^Orientation 16. Seminar 

Professors Callahan, Dickinson, and Franciscus. 1 or 2 points. 

Lecture and discussion of topics of importance to the therapist in practice, including organization 
and administration of departments of physical therapy; job placement and recent developments in 
physical medicine. Seniors will register for 2 points, which will include a general survey of occu- 
pational therapy, with emphasis on theoretical principles as apphed to major disability areas. 

*Thermo- and hydrotherapy 10 

Professor Darling and Miss Jones. 2 points. 

The physiology of heat balance in the human body and of the efifects of application of external heat 
or cold to the body. Theory and technique of application of heat or cold. The electromagnetic 
spectrum of radiant energy, especially as it applies to therapeutic heat. Theory and technique of the 
use of water and other liquids in therapy. 



► CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

The certificate program consists of the starred courses listed under the degree 
program above, plus the course below. 
The program is outlined on page 9. 

Neuroanatomy 95. Anatomy of the nervous system 

Dr. O'Brien. 2 points. 

Anatomy of the nervous system of man, including the structural unit, the cerebrospinal system, and 
the autonomic system. Attention will be given to the gross divisions of the brain, spinal cord, and 
peripheral nerves, with particular emphasis on the controls affecting voluntary motion. 



► POSTGRADUATE COURSE IN KINESIOLOGY 



Kinesiology 206 (spring term). Application of neurophysiologica! principles to 
human motion 

Miss Brunnstrom (in charge) and Professor Emmers. Saturday morning. 
2 points. 

Registration only by permission of the instructor. Minimum class, ten; maximum class, twenty. 
An advanced course designed for occupational therapists, physical therapists, and physicians who are 
graduates of professional schools acceptable to Columbia University. 

Further information and application forms are available from the Office of Postgraduate Courses, 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, New York 32, N.Y. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 



Outline of the Pro-am 



DEGREE PROGRAM: 65 POINTS 



JUNIOR year: autumn term 



JUNIOR year: spring term 



Anatomy 155 


3 


Clinical Experience 2 


2 


Kinesiology 105 


2 


Exercise 112 


4 


Massage 3 


2 


Orthopedics 136 


2 


Nursing Procedures 17 


1 


Psychiatry 102 


3 


Orientation 39 


1 


Rehabilitation 150 


2 


Physiology 55 or 157 


2 


Elective 


3 


Psychology 41 


2 






Elective 


3 






Total points 


16 


Total points 


16 


senior year: autumn term 




senior year: spring term 




Anatomy G4023 


3 


Anatomy G4024 


3 


Clinical Experience 3 


2 


Clinical Applications 130 


2 


Medicine and Surgery 101 


2 


Clinical Experience 4 


2 


Physical Therapy 115 


2 


Electrotherapy 14 


2 


Psychiatry 101 


2 


Kinesiology 206 


2 


Speech 163 


2 


Neurology 106 


2 


Elective 


3 


Orientation 16 


2 






Thermo- and hydrotherapy 10 


2 


Total points 


l6 


Total points 


T? 



clinical observation, instruction, and supervised experience: in June, July, and Sep- 
tember between the junior and senior years. 

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM: 34-37 POINTS 



autumn term 

Anatomy 155 
Kinesiology 105 
Massage 3 

Medicine and Surgery 101 
Neuroanatomy 95 
Nursing Procedures 17 
Orientation 39 
Physiology 55 or 157 
Elective (optional) 
Total points 

clinical instruction and supervised experience: in June, July, August, and September 
following completion of the course work. 





spring term 




3 
2 
2 


Clinical Applications 130 
Electrotherapy 14 
Exercise 112 


2 
2 
4 


2 
2 


Neurology 106 
Orientation 16 


2 

1 


1 
1 
2 


Orthopedics 136 
Psychiatry 102 
Rehabilitation 150 


2 
2 
2 


3 


Thermo- and hydrotherapy 10 
Total points 


2 


15-18 


l9 



10 PHYSICAL THERAPY 



Hospitals Affiliated for 
Clinical Experience 



Attendance in the hospitals and clinics listed below is concurrent with regular class- 
room work in the autumn and spring terms for students in the degree program. In 
addition, all students are required to spend a period during the summer in full-time 
clinical practice. During this period students attend lectures, clinics, and staff meet- 
ings, receive supervised practical experience in physical therapy, and are introduced 
to related treatment departments. 

BLYTHEDALE, VALHALLA, N.Y. 

Robert Stone. Executive Director 

A. David Gurewitsch, M.D. Medical Director 

Carroll Wardlaw. Chief Physical Therapist 

BURKE FOUNDATION REHABILITATION CENTER, WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. 

George Brush. Superintendent 

Edward J. Lorenze, M.D. Medical Director 

Anthony De Rosa. Coordinator of Rehabilitation and Education Services 

COLUMBU-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER HOSPITALS, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Alvin J. Binkert. Executive Vice President and General Manager 

Robert C. Darling, M.D. Director, Clinical Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

Samuel B. Feitelberg. Chief Physical Therapist 

HARTFORD REHAB ILrTATION CENTER, INCORPORATED, HARTFORD, CONN. 

Edward Scull, M.D. Supervising Medical Consultant 

Harold Glicklin. Supervisor, Physical Therapy, Hospital Services 

HOSPrrAL FOR SPECIAL SURGERY, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

T. Gordon Young. Director 

Anna Kara, M.D. Director, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

Florence Winter. Supervisor, Physical Therapy 

INSTFTUTE FOR THE CRIPPLED AND DISABLED, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

John Untereker, M.D. Director of Medical Services 
Blanche Talmud. Supervising Therapist 

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, NEW YORK UNrVERSITY-BELLEVUE 
MEDICAL CENTER, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Howard Rusk, M.D. Director 

Donald A. Covalt, M.D. Clinical Director 

Jack M. Hofkosh. Supervisor, Physical Therapy Department 

KESSLER INSTrrUTE FOR REHABILrTATION, WEST ORANGE, N.J. 

William K. Page, Jr. Administrator 
Henry H. Kessler, M.D. Medical Director 
Harry Borbe. Director of Physical Therapy 



PHYSICAL therapy: affiluted hospitals 11 

MIDDLESEX REHABILITATION AND POLIO HOSPITAL, NORTH BRUNSWICK, N.J 

Maurice Dorsen, Ph.D. Administrator 
Norman Reitman, M.D. Chief of Medical Staff 
Michael R. Sofranko. Chief Physical Therapist 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Kenneth Archibald, M.D. Director of Physical Medicine 
EUot Brown. Supervisor of Physical Therapy 

NEW YORK STATE REHABILITATION HOSPITAL, WEST HAVERSTRAW, N.Y. 

Seymour Bluestone, M.D. Director 

Morton Hoberman, M.D. Chief, Rehabilitation Services and Research 

Hyman Dervitz. Director, Physical Rehabilitation and Therapy Section 

ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Jane R. Winer, M.D. Medical Director 
Cora Alice Taylor. Chief Physical Therapist 

STATE OF CONNECTICUT VETERANS HOME AND HOSPITAL, ROCKY HILL, CONN. 

Herman L. Kamenetz, M.D. Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 
Herbert Jones. Supervisor of Physical Therapy 

VETERANS ADMINSTRATION HOSPITAL, BRONX, N.Y. 

Abraham M. Kleinman, M.D. Manager 

Alfred Ebel, M.D. Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service 

Morris Vogel. Chief of Physical Therapy 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL, BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

A. W. Kruger, M.D. Manager 

Harry H. Samberg, M.D. Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

Theodore F. Childs. Chief of Physical Therapy 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL, MANHATTAN, N.Y. 

William J. Dann. Manager 

Bernard StoU, M.D. Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service 

Aleks Tandyrak. Chief, Physical Therapy 

VETERANS ADMttJISTRATION HOSPITAL, MONTROSE, N.Y. 

Leon Rackow, M.D. Manager 

Jack Meislin, M.D. Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service 

Henry Stano. Chief, Physical Therapy 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION, NEW YORK REGIONAL OFFICE, RAY CLINICS, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Irvin Tepperberg, M.D. Chief, Physical Medicine Rehabilitation Service 
Elmer Marjay, M.D. Chief, Physical Medicine Group 
G. DiNubila. Chief Physical Therapist 

VISITING NLTRSE SERVICE OF NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Mary McCall Tyrie. Director of Education 

Helen Hennessy. Orthopedic Consultant; Supervisor of Physical Therapy 



Courses in Occupational Therapy 



CHAIRMAN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, AND 
MEDICAL DIRECTOR OF THE COURSES IN PHYSICAL AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY: 

Robert C. Darling, M.D. 

DIRECTOR: Marie Louise Franciscus, M.A. 

ASSOCIATE director: Martha E. Schnebly, M.A, 

Occupational therapy is the prescribed treatment of patients who are mentally or 
physically ill or disabled, by the use of activities such as the creative and manual 
arts, activities of daily living, and industrial and recreational skills. It has been 
termed "curing by doing" and plays an integral role in modern rehabilitation pro- 
grams. The occupational therapist works as a member of a treatment team which 
includes the physician, nurse, physical therapist, social worker, psychologist, and 
vocational counselor. Positions are available in general and in specialized hospitals, 
in outpatient centers and rehabilitation centers, in special schools, and with the 
home-bound. The therapist works with persons of all ages and in such specialized 
fields as psychiatry, tuberculosis, heart disease, orthopedics, and neurology. His 
education is broad, since he must be able to evaluate the patient's abilities and 
administer treatment which is directed toward psychological adjustment, physical 
restoration, and prevocational goals. The therapist must be prepared to under- 
stand and interpret the physician's prescription; to understand the implications of 
the diagnostic condition as a medical entity and its meaning to the patient in terms 
of his life goals. To meet the patient's needs, he must have the knowledge to analyze 
a variety of activities in terms of their psychological, physical, or prevocational 
implications. He must be prepared to teach the activities at a level which will 
stimulate and aid each patient to work toward the highest level of adjustment in 
terms of specific and realistic treatment goals. He must be able to work in harmony 
and interdependence with other members of the institution staff and as a coopera- 
tive and loyal member of the therapeutic community. He must have the knowledge 
and skills necessary to carry out the organization and administration of the occu- 
pational therapy clinic. 

Two programs of study are offered at Columbia, each based on a broad back- 
ground of general education, as previously indicated. The first program, which 
leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science, consists of twenty-five months of pro- 
fessional education, including nine months of clinical practice in affiliated hospitals. 
The second, which leads to a Certificate of Proficiency, consists of seventeen months 
of professional education, including nine months of clinical practice. See "Admis- 
sion Requirements" below. 

In both programs, classroom work is devoted to instruction in the biological, 
social, and clinical sciences, and to the treatment activities used by the occupational 
therapist, A program of student clerkships in conjunction with several hospitals 
and institutions of the metropolitan area enables students to observe and study 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 13 

treatment problems of specific diagnostic classifications as they are introduced in 
the medical lecture series and in treatment-application classes. Academic education 
is followed by a nine-month period of supervised clinical practice in departments of 
teaching hospitals affiliated with the University. 

The courses described in this bulletin meet the requirements set forth by the 
American Occupational Therapy Association and by the Council on Medical Edu- 
cation and Hospitals of the American Medical Association, as published in their 
Essentials of an Acceptable School of Occupational Therapy, which regulates the 
standards by which schools are accredited. Graduates of both the degree program 
and the certificate program are eligible for the examination leading to admission to 
the Registry of Occupational Therapists maintained by the American Occupational 
Therapy Association. This examination is held throughout the country in January 
and June of each year. Admission to the registry is the certification of a therapist to 
practice. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students are admitted only in September. Both men and women are admitted to 
professional courses, depending upon individual qualifications. Demands made on 
the physical endurance and emotional stamina of the therapist require a record of 
good health. Applicants must be graduates of an approved high school or the equiva- 
lent. Specific requirements for admission to each of the programs are as follows: 

FOR THE DEGREE PROGRAM 

The applicant must have completed at least two years of work in a college ap- 
proved by Columbia University. He must have earned 60 semester credits in liberal 
arts with a grade of C or better, including a minimum of 6 semester credits in biology 
(including zoology), chemistry, or physics; 6 semester credits in psychology; 3 
semester credits in sociology. 

As a guide to the student in planning these first two years of preparation in the 
liberal arts, it is suggested that he complete 6 semester credits in each of the follow- 
ing fields: English composition, English literature, biology (including zoology), 
chemistry or physics, psychology, and sociology. The remaining 24 credits might be 
chosen from such fields as speech, languages, the social sciences, and economics. 

Transfer credit is usually not allowed either for courses in physical education or 
for any specific professional courses. A maximum of 12 credits is allowed for 
courses completed in music and in fine and industrial arts, 

FOR THE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

The applicant must hold a Bachelor's degree acceptable to Columbia University 
or, exceptionally, he must have graduated from an accredited professional school in 
a field closely related to occupational therapy. The work for the Bachelor's degree 
must include 6 semester credits in biology (including zoology), chemistry, or phys- 
ics; 6 semester credits in psychology; and 3 semester credits in sociology. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE 
Forms to be used in making application for admission may be obtained by writing 



14 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

to the Occupational Therapy Office, College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 
168th Street, New York 32, N.Y. Applications should be filed several months in 
advance of the time at which students wish to begin their studies. The completed 
form must be accompanied by the application fee of $15. This fee is not returnable 
and is not credited toward tuition. 

Transcripts of all post-secondary school education should be forwarded by the 
registrars of the respective schools directly to the Director of Courses in Occupa- 
tional Therapy. A personal interview will be arranged for each applicant. 

PREPROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

A Summer Experience Program is conducted annually during July and August 
for college students who are undecided about their future vocations but have a 
basic interest in the medical field. This program gives the students an opportunity 
to determine whether the profession of occupational therapy meets their interests, 
talents, and expectations. Students are assigned as aides in occupational therapy 
departments of treatment centers or hospitals within the New York metropolitan 
area. In many cases financial compensation is given by the treatment centers to 
those student aides who need the summer months for gainful employment to help 
defray expenses for their continued education. This is not a University course and 
carries no fee nor academic credit. Applications for this program are accepted until 
March 15 and should be made through the guidance department of the student's 
college or by writing to: Summer Experience Program, Occupational Therapy 
Courses, College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, New York 
32, N.Y. 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 15 



Program of Study 



The University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruction 
or to change the instructors as may be necessary. 



► DEGREE PROGRAM 

The degree program includes two academic years (sixteen months) of theoretical 
and technical study on the campus and nine months of clinical practice in affiliated 
institutions of patient care. The utilization of summer periods for hospital experi- 
ence enables the student to complete the full program in approximately two cal- 
endar years. The clinical practice consists of full-time practical experience under 
the immediate direction of registered occupational therapists in psychiatric, ortho- 
pedic, neurological, general medical, and surgical services or hospitals. During the 
practice periods students also attend lectures, clinics, and staff meetings; they are 
introduced to related treatment departments and conduct case studies. Clinical 
practice must be completed within one year after the academic work is completed. 
For electives, students should consult the bulletins of Teachers College and the 
School of General Studies. 

The program is summarized in outline form on page 20. 

JUNIOR YEAR: AUTUMN TERM 

O.T. 1 1. Orientation to occupational therapy 

Professor Franciscus and special lecturers. 1 or 2 points. 

A survey of the field. The present uses, techniques, and philosophies of occupational therapy, with 
special reference to the roles of the therapist, to professional organizations, and to historical back- 
ground and recent developments. Included is the application of occupational therapy with general 
medical and surgical patients. Supplementary reading and reports. Orientation visits to hospital 
services. 

Psychology 41 . Child development 

Dr. Bennett. 2 points. 

The mental, motor, social, and emotional development of the child. Special attention is given to a 
consideration of stress situations encountered by the child and his methods of handling them. 

* Physiology 55 or 157. Human physiology 

Professors Dellenback {157) and Emmers {55). 2 points. 

A comprehensive discussion of the major organ systems of the human body and their functions, with 
emphasis on the physiology of exercise. Students with a minimum background of course work in 
biology, chemistry, and physics register for Physiology 55. Those who have had a comprehensive 
physiology course and considerable course work in biology, chemistry, and physics register for 
Physiology 157. 

"^Neuroanatomy 95. Anatomy of the nervous system 

Dr. O'Brien. 2 points. 

The anatomy of the nervous system of man, including the structural unit, the cerebrospinal system, 
and the autonomic system. Attention will be given to the gross divisions of the brain, spinal cord, 
and peripheral nerves, with particular emphasis on the controls affecting voluntary motion. 



16 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY: PROGRAM OF STUDY 

*Anatomy 1 55. Human anatomy 

Professor Noback and Dr. Smith. 3 points. 

Anatomy of the human body, with emphasis on those features which are most important for mus- 
cular activity. Instruction is given by means of lectures and laboratory work, the latter based on 
prepared dissection of the human body. 

*O.T. Fine Arts 27. Pottery 

Mr. Lowe. 2 points. 

An introduction to the possibilities and methods of using clay to create functional pottery with 
coils, with the potter's wheel, and by casting. Moldmaking, methods of decorating and glazing, and 
firing of kUns are studied for practical use in occupational therapy. 

O.T. Fine Arts 31. Elementary weaving 

Mrs. Vandiveer and Miss Miller. 2 points. 

A course with emphasis on the fundamental weaves of two-harness weaving. Other techniques are 
also learned. Apphcation of weaving to treatment in occupational therapy. 

O.T. Fine Arts 163. Elementary woodwork 

Mr. Lisenco. 2 points. 

This course is designed to orient the student to the fundamental principles of woodworking with 
hand tools. 

O.T. Graphic Arts 1. Art of hand printing 

Professor Loos and Mr. Frey. 1 point. 

The fundamentals of printing, including instruction in type faces, proofreading, and presswork. The 
laboratory affords practical application of hand typesetting and operation of hand and foot presses. 
Films, demonstrations, and field trips. 

JUNIOR YEAR: SPRING TERM 

*O.T. 12. Application in psychiatry 

Mrs. Fidler. 2 points. 

The application of current theories and practices of occupational therapy in meeting the therapeutic 
needs of mentally ill patients, and for patients in any setting who have emotional or psychological 
problems. Treatment, activity analysis, interpersonal relationships, communication, the hospital as a 
social system, personnel roles, and organization for treatment are considered. 

* Psychiatry 102. Elementary psychiatry 
Drs. O'Connor, Schucman, and others. 2 or 3 points. 

Etiology and symptomatology of the major and minor psychoses, including the psychoneuroses and 
their treatment, presented through lectures and clinical demonstrations. Work for the third point 
includes a survey of psychological tests and measurements, and interpretation of their results for 
the physical and occupational therapist. 

*O.T. Fine Arts 11 or 12. Needlecrafts 

Mrs. Vandiveer and Miss Miller. 2 points. 

This course includes instruction in clothing construction, pattern alteration, and hand and machine 
sewing. Also included are the various forms of embroidery, canvas stitchery, appliqu6, knitting, and 
crocheting. 

*O.T. Fine Arts 18. Leatherwork 

Mrs. Vandiveer and Miss Miller. 1 or 2 points. 

A course in hand leatherwork. Techniques of decoration and construction of small projects as used 
in occupational therapy. 

O.T. Fine Arts 102. Fundamentals of art and design 

Instructor to be announced. 2 points. 

A general survey course in the arts, which stresses the fundamentals of design as applied to crafts, 
commercial design, drawing, and painting. Museum and store visits. Lectures, readings, and discus- 
sion. 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY: PROGRAM OF STUDY 17 

O.T. Clerkship 2. Case evaluations of psychiatric patients 

Mrs. Fidler (coordinator). 2 points. 

Correlation of instruction in psychology, psychiatry, and occupational therapy theory by assigned 
patient work-ups in occupational therapy units. A rotating clinical schedule is assigned each student. 
Each session is followed by a seminar discussion. Required written reports and field trips. 

Elective in group development (2 or 3 points) 
Elective in skills (2 points) 

SENIOR YEAR: AUTUMN TERM 

^Medicine and Surgery 1 01 . General medicine and surgery 

Professor Downey and Dr. Price. 2 points. 

General medicine (Professor Downey) : a survey of the more common diseases, with emphasis on 
pulmonary tuberculosis and cardiac disorders. Lectures deal primarily with the relationship of patho- 
logical physiology to the development of signs and symptoms of disease. General surgery (Dr. 
Price) : a survey of those common diseases for which there is surgical emphasis. 

* Kinesiology 105. Applied anatomy and kinesiology 

Miss Brunnstrom (in charge), Professor Schnebly, and others. 2 points. 

Application of knowledge of gross anatomy of skeletal and muscular systems to mechanics of bodily 
movement. Analysis of skills used in daily activities and other activities in physical and occupational 
therapy. Lectures and laboratory. 

Rehabilitation 115. Prevocationai evaluation 

Mrs. Rhodes. 2 points. 

An orientation to a variety of occupational situations and to the physical, mental, and emotional 
demands made on the worker. Analyses are made of industrial processes and the duties of the 
homemaker, and consideration is given to the principles of energy conservation. The place of occu- 
pational therapy in prevocationai exploration and evaluation is discussed. Films and field visits. 

O.T. Fine Arts 105. Interpretive design 

Mrs. Vandiveer and Miss Miller. 2 or 3 points. 

A course in various design media applicable to occupational therapy. Basic content includes experi- 
ence in design techniques and decoration as applied to textiles, plastics, paper, and wood. This 
course is adaptable to the level of competence of the individual student, research being available 
for the advanced student. 

O.T. Fine Arts 133. Advanced weaving 

Mrs. Vandiveer and Miss Miller. 2 points. 

A course in four-harness weaving, including pattern drafts, fabric analysis, and experimental use of 
fibers and color. The development of loom adaptations as related to treatment procedures is stressed. 

O.T. Fine Arts 1 65. Advanced woodwork 

Mr. Lisenco. 2 points. 

This course is a contmuation of O.T. Fine Arts 163 and includes an introduction to the uses of 
power machinery. 

O.T. Clerkship 3. Application in special fields 

Mrs. Vandiveer (coordinator). 2 points. 

This course emphasizes the study of the role of occupational therapy in general medicine, surgery, 
and special fields, includmg the blind, the deaf, and the treatment aims with various age groups. 
Students visit a comprehensive group of hospitals, and acquire wide experience in the various situa- 
tions. A weekly seminar is held to discuss and supplement the experience received during the clerk- 
ship visits. 

Elective (2 points) 



18 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY: PROGRAM OF STUDY 

SENIOR YEAR: SPRING TERM 

O.T. 22. Departmental administration 

Professor Schnebly and special lecturers. 2 points. 

Study of the departmental organization and administration of occupational therapy as a service 
within a larger organizational framework. Includes basic procedures, principles, legal aspects, and 
general guides. Introduction to governmental and nongovernmental agencies that malce up the com- 
munity of rehabilitation resources. Supplementary reading, term projects, and reports. Guest lectiurers. 

*Exercise 112. Principles and application in treatment 

Professors Darling, Dickinson, Hoberman, Schnebly, and associates. 3 points. 

The basic principles of therapeutic exercise including the physiology of exercise, muscle evaluation 
and re-education, and tests and measurements. Laboratory sessions are used to instruct in the ap- 
pUcation of these principles, through occupational therapy procedures, to the treatment of patients 
with orthopedic and neurological disabilities. 

^Neurology 106. Clinical neurology 

Dr. Gallinek. 2 points. 

Etiology, symptomatology, and treatment in diseases of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. 

"Orthopedics 136. Orthopedics 

Dr. Andrews. 2 points. 

Lectures and clinical presentations descriptive of orthopedic conditions, including discussion of re- 
lated problems — social, medical, surgical, and rehabilitation. 

Rehabilitation 120. Pediatrics, geriatrics, and special senses 

Professor Franciscus and special lecturers. 1 point. 

Consideration of factors which affect all disability areas, including medical management and psy- 
chological problems, as well as treatment application with children and the aged, and with visual, 
hearing, and speech disabilities. 

Rehabilitation 1 26. Activities of daily living 

Mrs. Vandiveer. 2 points. 

A laboratory course to acquaint the student with some of the materials, equipment, and techniques 
to aid the handicapped in attaining maximum self-sufficiency. Consideration is given to the needs 
of persons with motor, sensory, and emotional handicaps, as well as energy conservation techniques 
for the cardiac and tuberculous. Also includes experience in making functional splints. 

*O.T. Fine Arts 163. Metalvyork and jewelry 

Mr. Lisenco. 2 points. 

A course in the basic techniques of hammered metal and jewehy. Elementary principles of me- 
chanical drawing. 

O.T. Clerkship 4. Physical disabilities 

Mrs. Vandiveer (coordinator). 2 points. 

Application of current principles and practices of therapeutic exercise as applied through occupa- 
tional therapy techniques. A correlation of aU previous and concurrent instruction in physical dis- 
abilities. Assigned case studies of patient application and study of allied professional fields. Weekly 
clinical assigmnents will be followed by a seminar to discuss cases and problems encountered. 

Elective in skills (2 points) 



► CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

The certificate program is completed in seventeen months. For eight months 
students study theoretical and technical subjects which consist of the starred courses 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY: PROGRAM OF STUDY 19 

listed under the degree program plus those given below. In addition, students 
attend a weekly seminar throughout the academic year for readings and discus- 
sions of content areas of O.T. 11, O.T. 22, and Rehabilitation 120, as described 
under the degree program. Clinical practice of at least nine months is the same 
as described for degree candidates. The program is summarized in outline form 
on page. 20. 

ADDITIONAL AUTUMN-TERM COURSES 

O.T. Fine Arts 11. NeedSecrafts 

Mrs. Vandiveer. 2 points. 

For description, see listing above under spring term, junior year. 

O.T. Fine Arts 1 67. Woodwork 

Mr. Lisenco. 2 points. 

A course designed to orient students in the fundamentals of woodworking and to develop a reason- 
able skill in the use of hand tools and finishing processes. An introduction to the use of power tools. 

ADDITIONAL SPRING-TERM COURSES 

Rehabilitation 122. Activities of daily living and prevocational evaluation 

Instructor to be announced. 2 points. 

A laboratory course to acquaint the student with some of the materials, equipment, and techniques 
to aid the handicapped in attaining maximum self-sufficiency through self-help and homemaking ac- 
tivities. Methods of prevocational and vocational evaluation are considered, including testing pro- 
grams as well as analysis of the worker and occupations. 

O.T. Fine Arts 36. Weaving 

Mrs. Vandiveer and Miss Miller. 2 points. 

A course in two- and four-harness weaving and other techniques of fabrication. The application of 
weaving to occupational therapy is included. 

O.T. Clerkship 6. Clinical project 

Professor Franciscus (adviser). 1 point. 

Independent study in an area of particular interest. Projects are planned individually with the ad- 
viser and include a survey of pertinent literature, field work in a treatment center when practicable, 
attendance at and participation in periodic class meetings, and a written report. 



► POSTGRADUATE COURSE IN KINESIOLOGY 

Kinesiology 206 (spring term). Application of neurophysiological principies of 
human motions 

Miss Brunnstrom (in charge), and Professor Emmers. Saturday morning. 
2 points. 

Registration only by permission of the instructors. Minimum class, ten; maximum class, twenty. 
An advanced course designed for occupational therapists, physical therapists, and physicians who are 
graduates of professional schools acceptable to Columbia University. 

Further information and application forms are available from the Office of Postgraduate Courses, 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, New York 32, N.Y. 



20 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 



Outline of the Program 



DEGREE PROGRAM: 70 POINTS 



JUNIOR year: AUTUMN TERM 




JUNIOR year: SPRING TERM 




O.T. 1 1 : Orientation 


2 


O.T. 12: Psychiatric application 


2 


Psych. 41 : Child development 


2 


Psychiatry 102 


3 


Physiology 55 or 157 


2 


O.T.F.A. 12: Needlecrafts 


2 


Neuroanatomy 95 


2 


O.T.F.A. 18: Leatherwork 


2 


Anatomy 155 


3 


O.T.F.A. 102: Art and design 


2 


O.T.F.A. 27 : Pottery 


2 


O.T. Clerkship 2: Psychiatric app. 


2 


O.T.F.A. 3 1 : Elem. weaving 


2 


Elective: Group development 2 or 3 


O.T.F.A. 163: Elem. v/oodwork 


2 


Elective in skills 


2 


O.T.G.A. 1 : Printing 


1 
18 






Total points 


Total points 17 oi 


•18 


SENIOR YEAR : AUTUMN TERM 




senior year: spring term 




Medicine and Surgery 101 


2 


O.T. 22: Administration 


2 


Kinesiology 105 


2 


Exercise 112: Principles and app. 


3 


Rehab. 115: Prevocational eval. 


2 


Neurology 106 


2 


O.T.F.A. 105: Design 


3 


Orthopedics 136 


2 


O.T.F.A. 133: Adv. weaving 


2 


Rehab. 120: Pediatrics and geriatrics 


1 


O.T.F.A. 165: Adv. woodwork 


2 


Rehab. 126: Daily living activities 


2 


O.T. Clerkship 3 : Special fields 


2 


O.T.F.A. 168: Metalwork 


2 


Elective 


2 or 3 


O.T. Clerkship 4: Physical restoration 


2 






Elective in skills 

Total points 


2 


Total points 


17 or 18 


18 



clinical practice in psychiatry: June— August, between the two years. 
CLINICAL practice IN SPECIFIED FIELDS: July— December, after the senior year. 

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM: 38 POINTS 



AUTUMN TERM 

Physiology 55 or 157 
Neuroanatomy 95 
Kinesiology 105 
Anatomy 155 
Medicine and Surgery 101 
O.T.F.A. 1 1 : Needlecrafts 
O.T.F.A. 27: Pottery 
O.T.F.A. 105: Design 
O.T.F.A. 167: Woodwork 



SPRING TERM 

2 O.T. 12: Psychiatric application 2 

2 Exercise 112: Principles and app. 3 

2 Psychiatry 102 2 

3 Neurology 106 2 
2 Orthopedics 136 2 
2 Rehab. 122: Daily living activities 2 
2 O.T.F.A. 18: Leatherwork 1 
2 O.T.F.A. 36: Weaving 2 
2 O.T.F.A. 168: Metalwork 2 

O.T. Clerkship 6: Clinical project 1 

19 Total points 19 



Total points 

SEMINAR: weekly throughout the academic year. 

CLINICAL PRACTICE IN SPECIFIED FIELDS: July-March, following completion of the aca 
demic program. 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 21 



Hospitals and Agencies 
Affiliated for Clinical Practice 



BIRD S. COLER HOME AND HOSPITAL, WELFARE ISLAND, N.Y. 

George L. George, M.D. Deputy Medical Superintendent 

Milton Lowenthal, M.D. Director, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

(Mrs.) Carolyn Aggarwal, O.T.R. Chief Occupational Therapist 

children's HOSPITAL, BUFFALO, N.Y. 

Moir P. Tanner. Director 

Mitchell I. Rubin, M.D. Chief of Pediatrics 

(Mrs.) Beverly Young, O.T.R. Director of Occupational Therapy 

children's rehabilitation institute, inc. for cerebral palsy, reisterstown, md. 
William P. Germaine. Executive Director 
Winthrop M. Phelps, M.D. Medical Director 
Patricia Potter, O.T.R. Director of Occupational Therapy 

COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER HOSPITALS, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Alvin J. Binkert. Executive Vice President 

Robert C. Darling, M.D. Director, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

Gerda Paul, O.T.R. Chief Occupational Therapist 

CONNECTICUT VALLEY HOSPITAL, MIDDLETOWN, CONN. 

Harry S. Whiting, M.D. Superintendent 

(Mrs.) Virginia S. Holmberg, O.T.R. Supervisor of Occupational Therapy 

CURATIVE WORKSHOP, UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

William Erdman, Jr., M.D. Medical Consultant 
S. A. Christides, M.D. Medical Consultant 
Clare S. Spackman, O.T.R. Director 

DELAWARE CURATIVE WORKSHOP, INC., WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Mae D. Hightower, O.T.R. Executive Director 

Arthur J. Heather, M.D. Medical Consultant 

Dorothy L. Kester, O.T.R. Chief Occupational Therapist 

HARTFORD REHABILITATION CENTER, INCORPORATED, HARTFORD, CONN. 

June Sokolov, O.T.R. Executive Director 

Arthur D. Wolfe, M.D. Supervising Medical Consultant 

Clari Bare, O.T.R. Supervisor of Occupational Therapy 

INSTITUTE FOR THE CRIPPLED AND DISABLED, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

James N. Burrows. Director 

John Untereker, M.D. Medical Director 

Oramella Marvin-Smith, O.T.R. Director of Occupational Therapy 

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, NEW YORK UNIVERSITY— BELLEVUE 
MEDICAL CENTER, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Margaret E. Peters. Administrator 
Donald A. Covalt, M.D. Associate Director 
Frances Helmig, O.T.R. Chief Occupational Therapist 



22 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY: AFFILIATED HOSPITALS 

MENORAH HOME AND HOSPITAL FOR THE AGED, BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

(Mrs.) Mildred Felder. Executive Director 

(Mrs.) Doreen Scheiner, O.T.R. Director of Occupational Therapy 

MONTEFIORE HOSPITAL, NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Martin Cherkasky, M.D. Director 

Jerome S. Tobis, M.D. Chief, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine 

Wimberly Edwards, O.T.R. Acting Director of Occupational Therapy 

NEWINGTON HOSPITAL FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN, NEWINGTON, CONN. 

Berger E. Foss. Executive Director 

John C. Allen, M.D. Physiatrist 

Mary Fiorentino, O.T.R. Director of Occupational Therapy 

NEW JERSEY STATE HOSPITAL, TRENTON, N.J. 

Harold S. Magee, M.D. Medical Director and Chief Executive Officer 
Naida Ackley, O.T.R. Director of Occupational Therapy 

NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HYGIENE 

Paul H. Hoch. Commissioner 

(Mrs.) Viola R. McGrath, O.T.R. Director of Occupational Therapy 

New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, N.Y. 
Lawrence C. Kolb, M.D. Director 

(Mrs.) Alice R. Trei, O.T.R. Senior Occupational Therapist 
(Mrs.) Gail S. Fidler, O.T.R. Associate in Occupational Therapy, Columbia 

NORWICH HOSPITAL, NORWICH, CONN. 

Ronald H. Kettle, M.D. Medical Director 

Warren Burns, M.D. Assistant Medical Director 

Harry Kromer, R.N., O.T.R. Director of Occupational Therapy 

THE REHABILITATION CENTER OF SOUTHERN FAIRFIELD COUNTY, INC., STAMFORD, CONN. 

Ruby C. Oscarson, R.P.T. Executive Director 

Charles G. McKendree, M.D. Medical Director 

Barbara Neuhaus, O.T.R. Director of Occupational Therapy 

U.S. ARMY HOSPITALS 

Office of the Surgeon General, Washington, D.C. 
Lois M. Forsythe, Col., A.M.S.C. Chief, Army Medical Specialist Corps 
Cordelia Myers, Lt. Col., A.M.S.C. Chief, Occupational Therapist Section, Army 

Medical Specialist Corps 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITALS 

Central Office, Washington, D.C. 
A. B. C. Knudson, M.D. Director, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service 
George D. Frye, O.T.R. Director, Occupational Therapy 

Bronx, New York 
A.M. Kleinman, M.D. Hospital Director 

Alfred Ebel, M.D. Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service 
Cecilia Sattely, O.T.R. Chief, Occupational Therapy 

Oteen, North Carolina 
James D. Murphy, M.D. Hospital Director 

Joseph E. Cox, M.D. Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service 
Charlotte F. Smith, O.T.R. Chief, Occupational Therapy 

Richmond, Virginia 
James E. Cottrell, M.D. Hospital Director 
Helen Applebaum, O.T.R. Chief, Occupational Therapy 



Registration and Expenses 

► REGISTRATION 

Before attending University courses, each student must register in person during 
the registration period (see the Academic Calendar, on page 35). The registra- 
tion procedure is as follows: 

1. The student reports to the Office of Physical and Occupational Therapy on the 
third floor of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, and 
fills out various forms giving information required for University records. 

2. He has his program approved by the Director. 

3. He takes his completed forms to the Office of the Registrar and pays his fees 
in the Office of the Bursar. 

The Office of the Registrar is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



AUDITING COURSES 

Degree candidates who are enrolled for 15 points or more in the current term may 
audit one or two courses in any division of the University without charge. Applica- 
tion is made at the Registrar's Office during the change-of-program period in each 
term: Monday, September 30, through Saturday noon, October 5, for the autumn 
term; Monday, February 10, through Saturday noon, February 15, for the spring 
term. Applications may not be filed before or after these dates. 

For obvious reasons, elementary language courses, laboratory courses, and 
seminars wUl not be open to auditors. Other courses may be closed because of 
space limitations. In no case will an audited course appear on the student's record, 
nor is it possible to turn an audited course into a credit course by paying the fee 
after the fact. 



REGULATIONS 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student 
of the University during the term for which he is registered unless his connection 
with the University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student 
registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same time be regis- 
tered in any other school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other 
institution, without the specific authorization of the dean or director of the school 
or college of the University in which he is first registered. 

The privileges of the University are not available to any student until he has com- 
pleted his registration. Since, under the University statutes, payment of fees is part 
of registration, no student's registration is complete until his fees have been paid. 
No student is permitted to attend any University course for which he is not 
officially registered unless he has been granted auditing privileges. No student may 



24 REGISTRATION • FEES 

register after the stated period unless he obtains the written consent of the proper 
dean or director. 



ATTENDANCE AND LENGTH OF RESIDENCE 

No degree or certificate will be granted to a student who has not registered for and 
attended at the University courses of instruction equivalent to at least one academic 
year of full-time work. 

Students are held accountable for absences incurred owing to late enrollment and 
are expected to attend punctually each class or laboratory exercise in each course. 
For credit toward the certificate or degree, regular attendance is required in ad- 
dition to the proficiency attested by classwork and examination. 

Students whose religious duties conflict at any time with academic requirements 
should apply to the proper Director for an equitable solution. 

A student in good standing may, for reasons of weight, be granted a leave of 
absence by the Director. 



ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
him of academic credits, his graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the Uni- 
versity, which is free to cancel his registration at any time on any grounds which it 
deems proper. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the President 
and, subject to his reserved powers, in the dean of each faculty and the director of 
the work of each administrative board. 



GRADES AND CREDITS 

The student's performance in a course is reported according to the following 
grades: A, excellent; B, good; C, fair; and F, failure. A, B, and C are passing grades 
counting for credit toward the degree or certificate and accepted as the basis for 
advancement to a higher course. A student who does not receive a mark of C or 
above in a prescribed course must repeat that course. 

The mark MU is not a grade and simply implies that in the opinion of the instruc- 
tor the student may be given the privilege of taking a special examination. When this 
mark is given at the end of the autumn term, it does not necessarily mean that the 
student may not pursue his courses in the spring term, but that he will get no credit 
for the course in question until he has received a definite passing grade. 



► FEES 

Tuition, the comprehensive fee, and laboratory deposits are payable each term in 
advance and as part of registration; the student health and hospital fee for the aca- 
demic year is payable at registration in September. If these fees are paid after the 
last day of registration (see the Academic Calendar), they will not be reduced, and 
a late fee of $6.00 will be imposed. 



FEES 25 

The following fees, prescribed by statute for each autumn and spring term, are 
subject to change at the discretion of the trustees: 

Comprehensive fee for students enrolled for: 

Less than 12 points $ 25.00 

Twelve points or more 50.00 

With the proviso that in no instance shall the amount of the combined 

comprehensive fee and tuition be less than 50.00 

Registration as engaged only in research 50.00 

Tuition for all courses, per point, except where a special fee is fixed 42.00 

With the proviso that the fee for a program of 15 or more points is 625.00 

Clinical supervisory fee 12.00 

Student health and hospital fee (see below) 50.00 

APPLICATION FEES AND LATE FEES 

Application for admission $ 15.00 

Application for each special examination 10.00 

Renewal of application for a degree or certificate (see below) 1.00 

Late registration 6.00 

Late application, or late renewal of application, for a degree or certificate 5.00 

ACCEPTANCE FEE 

Within two weeks after an applicant has been notified that his application has 
been accepted, he must notify the Director that he intends to matriculate and must 
accompany his letter with a check or money order for $50, payable to Columbia 
University. This acceptance fee will be retained by the University, and if the appli- 
cant does not register for the following academic year, it will not be returned unless 
the University for any reason cancels the acceptance. If he registers in the courses in 
physical or occupational therapy in the class to which he has been admitted, the 
amount of the acceptance fee will be deducted from his tuition. 

WITHDRAWAL AND REBATES 

A student in good academic standing who is not subject to discipline will always 
be given an honorable discharge if he wishes to withdraw from the University. If he 
is under twenty-one years of age, his parent or guardian must first give consent in 
writing to the Director. 

The comprehensive fee, the student health and hospital fee, application fees, late 
fees, and special fees are not subject to rebate. If a student withdraws from the 
School, a partial return of the tuition may be authorized by the Registrar. When a 
rebate is allowed, it will be reckoned from the day upon which the Registrar receives 
written notice from the student. 

DEPOSITS 

A deposit for the use of lockers, keys, apparatus, material, and the hke is required 
in certain courses. 



26 FEES • ESTIMATED EXPENSES 



STUDENT HEALTH AND HOSPITAL FEE 



The student health and hospital fee is used to pay the annual premium of the 
Associated Hospital Service of New York for hospital insurance and to pay part of 
the cost of the student health service. A student who already carries hospital insur- 
ance will be charged $7.28. 

A physical examination (including x-ray and tuberculin tests) will be given each 
student in the professional courses during the first term of attendance. Further physi- 
cal examinations will be given during the training period, whenever it is deemed 
advisable. 

A student who requires hospitalization will be taken care of either in the wards of 
the Medical Center, or elsewhere, under his hospitalization insurance policy. 

Daily office hours are held by the Student Health Service, Room 2-220, Vander- 
bilt Clinic. Members of the Health Service are available to attend ill students if they 
live near the Medical Center. 

APPLICATION OR RENEWAL OF APPLICATION FOR A DEGREE OR CERTIFICATE 

A candidate for a degree or certificate must file application by the date specified 
in the Academic Calendar. If the degree or certificate is not earned by the next regu- 
lar time for the issuance of diplomas subsequent to the date of filing, the application 
may be renewed for a fee of $1.00 each time that the candidate chooses to come 
up for consideration. Degrees and certificates are awarded three times a year — in 
October, February, and June. 



► ESTIMATED EXPENSES 



UNIVERSITY EXPENSES (TOTAL PROGRAM) 

Tuition 

Comprehensive fee 
Clinical supervisory fee 
Health and hospital fee 


DEGREE PROGRJ 

$2,500.00 

200.00 

24.00 

100.00 


^M CERTI 

$350-$535 

600 

65 


FICATE PROGRAM 
$1,250.00 

100.00 
12.00 
50.00 


TOTAL 
LIVING EXPENSES (PER ACADEMIC YEAR) 

Room 
Board 
Subway and bus fares (within program) 


$2,824.00 

$ 


$1,412.00 


TOTAL 


1,015- 


-$1,200 



The cost of books, materials, equipment, and uniforms varies with the program 
chosen. In physical therapy, degree candidates will spend, in all, about $115; certifi- 
cate candidates, about $100. In occupational therapy, degree candidates will spend 
about $200; certificate candidates, about $150. Fees for materials and equipment in 
studio classes are payable at the time of registration and are subject to change in 
accord with market prices. 

During clinical practice, occupational therapy students spend some four months 
in residence in hospitals where they receive full maintenance (room, board, and 
laundry). In some instances a maintenance arrangement is possible for a longer 



HOUSING 27 

period of time. The living expenses of physical therapy students during the summer 
clinical practice periods will vary depending upon the accommodations provided by 
the hospitals to which they are assigned. 

Students who are assigned to hospitals outside the local area will need to pay 
nominal transportation expenses. 

IMPORTANT note: According to Treasury decision 6291, under Section 162 of 
the 1954 Internal Revenue Code, income tax deductions are allowed in many in- 
stances for tuition and other educational expenses. Students are referred to the 
federal ruling on income tax deductions for teachers and other professional peo- 
ple seeking to maintain or improve skills required in their employment. 



► HOUSING 

All women students under twenty-one years of age who are not living at home or 
with relatives are required to secure approval of their residence from the Directors. 
Information concerning desirable accommodations may be obtained from the Physi- 
cal and Occupational Therapy Office (see also below). 

UNIVERSITY RESIDENCE HALLS 

The University provides housing on the Morningside campus for undergraduate 
and graduate men and women, both single and married. Inquiries about men's 
housing and the accommodations for married students should be directed to the 
Residence Halls Office, 125 Livingston Hall, Columbia University, New York 27, 
N.Y. Women students should write direct to the women's residence hall, Johnson 
Hall, 41 1 West 116th Street, New York 27, N.Y. 

Rates in the graduate men's residence halls range from $390 to $450 for the 
academic year. In Johnson Hall, the rates range from $325 to $525, with fifteen 
rooms at rates from $285 to $325 for the academic year available on the basis of 
acute financial need. The median rate, however, is $475. 

An optional prepaid board plan is available in the men's residence halls. The 
cost of fifteen meals a week is $480 for the academic year. The residents of John- 
son Hall are required to take breakfast and dinner there seven days a week at a 
cost of $425 for the academic year. In assessing board costs, the student should, 
of course, take into consideration the cost of meals during holidays and vacations. 
All rates are subject to change. 

Woodbridge Hall, at 431 Riverside Drive, is the University's residence hall for 
married graduate students. Each apartment contains a livingroom, a bedroom, a 
complete kitchen, and a bathroom; basic furniture is provided. Rates range from 
$1,260 to $1,620 a year, including utilities, and assignment is for the full calendar 
year. These apartments are large enough to accommodate a couple with one child. 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 

Students who wish to live in furnished rooms or apartments off campus should 
consult the Registry of Off-Campus Accommodations, 115 Livingston Hall, Colum- 
bia University, New York 27, N.Y., for information about the services rendered 
by the Registry. Single rooms in private apartments range from $9 to $16 a week; 



28 HOUSING • LOANS 

double rooms, from $16 to $25. Most apartments, when available, are in the price 
range of $90 to $150 a month. 

International House, a privately owned student residence near the Morningside 
campus, has rooms for about five hundred graduate students, both foreign and 
American. Rates for the academic year are $375 to $700. To be eligible for admis- 
sion a student must be at least twenty-one years old and must be registered for a 
minimum of twelve points or for a program of full-time research. Address the 
Committee on Admissions, International House, 500 Riverside Drive, New York 27. 

The King's Crown Hotel, 420 West 1 1 6th Street, near the campus, is owned by 
the University. It provides accommodations at reasonable rates for relatives and 
guests of members of the University. 

► LOANS TO STUDENTS 

Long-term loans at low interest rates are available from the University for tuition 
and fees, and under certain circumstances, for living expenses. Returning students 
should apply well in advance of September 1 , for the autumn term, and of Decem- 
ber 15, for the spring term. New students should apply before the registration period. 
Applications should be filed with the Director of the program in which the student 
is enrolled. 

Many states (among them Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York) 
have loan funds available to their residents who are United States citizens, and 
federal loan funds are available to full-time students under the National Defense 
Student Loan Program (Title II of the National Defense Education Act of 1958). 

For further information on loans and deferred payment, consult either the 
appropriate Director or the Office of Financial Aid. 

► SCHOLARSHIPS AND TRAINEESHIPS 

A limited number of scholarships are available to students in occupational 
therapy. Funds administered by a scholarship committee of the school are made 
available by various agencies and foundations: the Office of Vocational Rehabili- 
tation, United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare; the United 
Cerebral Palsy Association, Inc.; and the Jessie Smith Noyes Foundation. Appli- 
cations are judged on the basis of scholarship, financial need, and an assessment 
of potential contribution to the field; applications should be filed with the Director 
of Occupational Therapy courses two months before the beginning of the autumn 
or spring term on a form provided by the school. Other scholarship opportunities 
are available by direct application to the agencies concerned: the New York 
Occupational Therapy Association; the National Association of Business Clubs; 
the National Society for Crippled Children and Adults; the Elks National Founda- 
tion, and other foundations and local service organizations known personally to 
the student. 

► NEW YORK STATE SCHOLAR INCENTIVE AWARDS 

Any student who has been a legal resident of New York State for the preceding 



EMPLOYMENT 29 

year is entitled to a Scholar Incentive Award for each term in which he is regis- 
tered as a full-time degree candidate. The amount of this award is based upon the 
net taxable balance of his income and the income of those responsible for his 
support, as reported on the New York State income tax return for the previous 
calendar year. 

Applications and further information may be obtained from the Ofl&ce of 
Financial Aid, 107 Low Library, and in the office of the Dean. 



► EMPLOYMENT 

A student who needs to earn part of his expenses by working part time during 
the academic year should get in touch with the Student Employment Division, 
Office of University Placement, 425 West 117th Street. In order to help him, the 
Division requires that he file a short registration card and be interviewed by a staff 
member. Since employers must know when a student is free to work, little assistance 
can be given any student until his class schedule is known. The Division advises 
most full-time students to limit their part-time work to fifteen or, at the most, 
twenty hours a week. 

The Student Employment Division places students as tutors, translators, clerks, 
salesmen, waiters, technical workers, secretaries, typists, and the like. Average rates 
of pay for unskilled work are $1.25 per hour. Higher rates are paid students with 
specialized training. 

Men students are eligible for work-for-meals jobs in the University dining halls 
and in the Men's Faculty Club (two hours of work a day in return for three meals) . 
Applications must be filed with the Office by August 1. 

Wives of students may also register for part-time work. Those who are inter- 
ested in full-time jobs on the campus should apply at the University Personnel 
Office, Wing A, University Hall Annex; most of these jobs require typing and many 
require shorthand as well. Full-time employees are eligible for 6 points of tuition 
exemption in each term, primarily in evening classes in the School of General 
Studies. 

Students who wish to work full time during the summer vacation should register 
with the Student Employment Division early in the spring term. 

The Physical and Occupational Therapy Office maintains a listing of positions 
throughout the country that are available to graduate therapists. Current graduates 
and alumni are encouraged to refer to the Office for these positions. 



► THE INSTITUTE FOR THE CRIPPLED AND DISABLED 

The Institute for the Crippled and Disabled at 400 First Avenue, in cooperation 
with Columbia University, offers broad clinical and educational facilities for the 
training of physical therapy and occupational therapy students. There is an out- 
standing collection of reference books, periodicals, and pamphlets, concerning the 
handicapped, their problems, and their rehabilitation, which students may use. An 
occupational therapy teaching unit is used for instruction and contains a skills 
library. 



30 STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



► STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Clubs are the student organiza- 
tions which promote recreational, social, and professional activities. Within these 
clubs each class of students has its own organization and officers with representa- 
tives on the University Student Council. 

The Columbia University Student Council, composed of elected representatives 
from the students of the several schools and faculties of the University, represents 
the students in matters affecting the student body as a whole, with the object of 
promoting cooperation and understanding among the students, faculty, and admin- 
istration. 

Physical and occupational therapy students are eligible to make use of the facili- 
ties of the main campus at Broadway and 116th Street as well as those of the Medi- 
cal Center. The Student Handbook, which is distributed from the school office at 
registration, gives complete details about the libraries, sports, religious activities, 
social life on the campus, and the resources of New York City that students may 
enjoy at little expense. 

Graduates of the physical and occupational therapy programs may have member- 
ship in the Alumni Federation of Columbia University. 



Officers of Instruction 



David L. Andrews. Instructor in Orthopedics 

A.B., Williams; M.D., Columbia 

Michael Antell. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Public Health Practice 

M.D., Long Island College of Medicine; M.P.H., Harvard 

Gustav J. Beck. Instructor in Medicine 

B.S., Columbia; M.D., New York University 

Stephen L. Bennett. Instructor in Psychiatry 

B.S., Queens; M.D., Cornell 

Signe Brunnstrom. Instructor in Physical Therapy 

B.S., Uppsala College, Sweden; M.A., New York University; Physical Therapy, Royal Gymnastic 
Central Institute, Sweden 

Mary E. Callahan. Associate Professor of Physical Therapy 

B.S., New York University; M.A., Columbia; Graduate, Clinton Hospital School of Nursing; Cer- 
tificate in Physical Therapy, Posse Institute 

Malcolm B. Carpenter. Professor of Anatomy 

A.B., Columbia; M.D., Long Island 

Graham Clark. Assistant Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology 

B.S., M.D., Virginia 

Theodore Corbitt. Assistant in Physical Therapy 

B.S., Cincinnati; M.A., Certificate in Physical Therapy, New York University 

Robert C. Darling. Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

A.B., M.D., Harvard 

Robert Dellenback. Assistant Professor of Physiology 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., California (Los Angeles) 

Adelaide A. Deutsch, O.T.R. Associate in Occupational Therapy 

B.S. in Occupational Therapy, New York University; M.A., Columbia 

Ruth Dickinson. Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy 
B.S., Russell Sage; M.A., Certificate in Physical Therapy, Columbia 

John A. Downey. Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

B.S., M.D., Manitoba 

Raimond Emmers. Assistant Professor of Physiology 

A.B., East Texas Baptist; M.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Syracuse 

Samuel B, Feitelberg. Instructor in Physical Therapy 

B.S., M.A., Certificate in Physical Therapy, Columbia 

Gail S. Fidler, O.T.R. Associate in Occupational Therapy 

A.B., Lebanon Valley; Graduate, Philadelphia School of Occupational Therapy 

Ronald R. Fieve. Instructor in Psychiatry 

M.D., Harvard 

Marie Louise Franciscus, O.T.R. Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy 

B.S., Ohio State; M.A., Prof. Dip. in Ed., Columbia; Graduate, Philadelphia School of Occupational 
Therapy 



32 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Edward J. Frey. Lecturer in Graphic Arts (General Studies) 
Alfred Gallinek. Associate in Neurology 

M.D., Berlin 

A. David Gurewitsch. Clinical Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine 

M.D., Basel 

Lee C. Havens. Associate in Physical Therapy 

A.B., Smith; Certificate in Physical Therapy, Columbia 

Kenneth F. Herrold. Professor of Education (Teachers College) 

A.B., Bucknell; M.S.P.H., Michigan; Ed.D., Columbia 

Morton Hoberman. Associate Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and 
Rehabilitation 

B.S., New York University; M.B., M.D., Wayne 

Althea M. Jones. Instructor in Physical Therapy 

B.S., Panzer; Certificate in Physical Therapy, Hospital for Special Surgery 

Nathan Kaplan. Instructor in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

M.E., New York University; M.D., Chicago Medical School 

Shulamith Kastein. Lecturer in Otolaryngology 

Diploma, Vienna 

Richard G. Kraus. Professor of Education (Teachers College) 

A.B., College of the City of New York; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia 

Marion D. Laird. Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology 

B.A., Queens (Ontario); M.D., Toronto 

Paul Lindenberg. Instructor in Otolaryngology 

M.D., Vienna 

Yasha Lisenco. Instructor in Fine and Industrial Arts (Teachers College) 

B.S., College of the City of New York; M.A., Columbia 

Melvin Loos. Professor of Graphic Arts (General Studies) 

Manager, Printing OiBce, Columbia University Press 

Robert A. Lovi^e. Instructor in Fine and Industrial Arts (Teachers College) 

A.B., Princeton; M.A., Columbia 

Harrison L. McLaughlin. Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery 

M.D., CM., Queens (Ontario) 

J. Lowry Miller. Associate Clinical Professor of Dermatology 

A.B., North Carolina; M.D., Pennsylvania 

Johanna M. Miller. Assistant in Occupational Therapy 

A.B., Ursinus; Certificate in Occupational Therapy, Pennsylvania 

Charles R. Noback. Associate Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., Cornell; M.S., New York University; Ph.D., Minnesota 

Joseph L. O'Brien. Associate in Neurology 

A.B., Princeton; M.D., Cornell 

John F. O'Connor. Instructor in Psychiatry 

B.S., Columbia; M.D., State University of New York College of Medicine 

John B. Price, Jr. Instructor in Surgery 

M.A., Texas; M.D., Johns Hopkins 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 33 

Charlotte M. Rhodes. Assistant in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

B.S., M.A., Columbia 

Isabel P. Robinault, O.T.R. Associate in Occupational Therapy 

A.B., Barnard; M.A., Certificate in Occupational Therapy, New York University; Ph.D., Columbia 

Martha E. Schnebly, O.T.R. Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy 

B.S., Maryland State Teachers College; M.A., Certificate in Occupational Therapy, Columbia 

Helen Schucman. Instructor in Psychiatry 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

M. J, V. Smith. Instructor in Anatomy 

M.A., M.B., B.Chir., Cambridge 

Blanche Talmud. Instructor in Physical Therapy 

B.S., Certificate in Physical Therapy, New York University 

Lawrence C. Thum. Instructor in Psychiatry 

A.B., Stanford; M.D., Harvard 

Alice R. Trei, O.T.R. Instructor in Occupational Therapy 

B.S., New York University; Certificate in Occupational Therapy, Columbia 

Janet G. Vandiveer, O.T.R. Instructor in Occupational Therapy 

B.S., Columbia 

Lawrence H. Wisham. Assistant Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and 
Rehabilitation 

B.S., New York University; M.D., Chicago Medical School 

Shyh-Jong Yue. Associate Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and 

Rehabilitation 

M.D., National College of Medicine, Shanghai 

SPECIAL LECTURERS 

Irma Bartenieff. Research Assistant, Psychology Department, Jacobi Hospital 

Certificate in Physical Therapy, New York University 

Edith H. Brokaw, O.T.R. Consultant in Occupational Therapy 

Graduate, Philadelphia School of Occupational Therapy 

Jon Eisenson. Professor of Speech and Director of the Speech and Hearing Clinic, 
Queens College 

B.S.S., College of the City of New York; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia 

Marjorie Fish, O.T.R. Executive Director, American Occupational Therapy 
Association 

A.B., Swarthmore; M.A., Columbia; Graduate, Boston School of Occupational Therapy 

Margery Gross. Supervisor, Cerebral Palsy Department, Institute for the Crippled 
and Disabled 

A.S., New Haven Junior College; Certificate in Physical Therapy, Hospital for Special Surgery 

Helen Hennessy. Rehabilitation Consultant and Supervisor of Physical Therapy, 
Visiting Nurse Service of New York 

Graduate, Yale School of Nursing; B.S., Columbia; Certificate in Physical Therapy, Hospital for 
Special Surgery 

Paul H. Hepler. Associate Professor of Fine Art, State University of New York, 
College of Education at Geneseo 

A.B., Western Michigan; M.A., Columbia 



34 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Earl Lewis, Prosthetic Research and Education Specialist, Veteran's Administra- 
tion 

A.B., Brooklyn; Certificate in Physical Therapy, Stanford; M.A., New York University 

Jacob Meislin, Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital, Montrose, N. Y. 

B.S., College of the City of New York; M.D., Lausanne 

Agnes D. Ness, O.T.R. Industrial Arts Teacher, Lexington School for the Deaf 

B.S., Certificate in Occupational Therapy, New York University; M.A., Columbia 

Janet Pinner. Director of Selective Placement Service, New York State Employ- 
ment Service 

A.B., Adelphi 

Cecilia Sattely, O.T.R. Chief, Occupational Therapy, Bronx Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital 

B.S. in Occupational Therapy, M.A., New York University 

Frances L. Shuff, O.T.R. Administration Program Coordinator and Executive 
Assistant, Bronx Municipal Hospital Center 

A.B., Skidmore; M.A., Certificate in Occupational Therapy, New York University 

Joseph E. Snyder. Assistant Vice President, Presbyterian Hospital 

A.B., Nebraska; M.D., Pennsylvania 

Elizabeth M. Wagner, O.T.R. Program Consultant, The National Society for 
Crippled Children and Adults, Inc. 

Graduate, Philadelphia School of Occupational Therapy 

Sol L. Warren. State Coordinator of Internship Training, Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation, New York State Department of Education 

B.S., Brooklyn; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., New York University 

Donald V. Wilson. Secretary -General, International Society for the Rehabilitation 
of the Disabled 

A.B., LL.D., Muskingum; LL.B., Western Reserve; M.A., Chicago 



Academic Calendar, 1963-1964 



AUTUMN TERM 

Sept 24-25 Tuesday-Wednesday. Registration, including payment of fees.* 

26 Thursday. Classes begin. 

Oct 5 Saturday until noon. Last day for making changes in programs. 

30 Wednesday. Award of October degrees and certificates. 

Nov 5 Tuesday. Election Day. Holiday. 

28 Thursday, through December 1, Sunday. Thanksgiving Holidays. 
Dec 2 Monday. Last day for filing application or renewal of application for 

degrees and certificates to be awarded in February.! 
22 Sunday, through January 5, 1964, Sunday. Christmas Holidays. 

Jan 20-30 Monday-Thursday. Midyear examinations. 
30 Thursday. Term ends. 

SPRING TERM 

Feb 3-4 Monday-Tuesday. Registration, including payment of fees.* 
5 Wednesday. Classes begin. 

15 Saturday until noon. Last day for making changes in programs. 

26 Wednesday. Award of February degrees and certificates. 

Mar 2 Monday. Last day for filing application or renewal of application 

for degrees and certificates to be awarded in June (see May 1 entry 
below ).t 

29 Sunday, through April 5, Sunday. Spring Holidays. 

May 1 Friday. Last day for filing late applications for June degrees. 

1 8-28 Monday-Thursday. Final examinations. 

30 Saturday. Memorial Day. A University holiday except for sched- 
uled examinations. Term ends. 

COMMENCEMENT 

May 31 Sunday. Baccalaureate Service. 

June 2 Tuesday. Conferring of degrees and certificates. 

Aug 3 Monday. Last day for filing application or renewal of application 

for degrees and certificates to be awarded in October, t 



* Students allowed to register after the period specified must pay a late fee. 
t Students who file application after this date must pay a late fee. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



0050083880 




1. BABIES HOSPITAL 

2. PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
N.Y. ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL 
SLOANE HOSPITAL 

SQUIER UROLOGICAL CLINIC 

3. HARKNESS PAVILION 

4. POWER HOUSE 

5. COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 
AND SURGEONS 

6. VANDERBILT CLINIC 
SCHOOL OF DENTAL AND 
ORAL SURGERY 



7. N.Y. CITY DEPT. OF HEALTH 
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND 

ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICINE 

8. INSTITUTE OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 

9. MAXWELL HALL 

10. NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE 

11. N.Y. STATE PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE 

12. BARD HALL 

13. HARKNESS MEMORIAL HALL 

14. FRANCIS DELAFIELD HOSPITAL, N.Y.C. 

15. PAULINE A. HARTFORD 
MEMORIAL CHAPEL 



To Reach the Medical Center: By subway, the Washington Heights Express of 
the IND Eighth Avenue or the Van Cortland Park train of the IRT Seventh 
Avenue. By bus, Fifth Avenue Bus #4 or #5. By car, the Westside Highway exit 
at the George Washington Bridge. Parking facilities are available at West 164th 
Street and Fort Washington Avenue.